Displays & Exhibits

  The Library's display case commemorates Veterans Day and  the 100th anniversary of the Armistice of World War I with books and DVDs on the Great War, soldier memoirs and military history.

The Library's display case commemorates Veterans Day and  the 100th anniversary of the Armistice of World War I with books and DVDs on the Great War, soldier memoirs and military history.

The Livingston Public Library welcomes exhibits and displays, which further the educational, cultural, intellectual, charitable and/or public service objectives of the Library. Exhibits and displays which incorporate books and other Library materials are especially encouraged.  The Library recognizes its role in nurturing local talent and culture and, therefore, extends its preference in scheduling exhibits and displays to local schools, civic and community groups and local artists.  The Library also encourages exhibits and displays by collectors, crafts people and hobbyists.  Other displays may be devoted to an aspect of community life, science, education, family life, local or other history, community accomplishments, national anniversaries or events, or traveling exhibits in various fields and areas of interest.

All exhibits are subject to the terms of the Livingston Public Library’s Exhibits and Displays Policy.

The Library has a lighted glass display case (H 15”; D 20”) by the entrance where the displays can last from 2 weeks to a month.  Scheduling for this is arranged several months in advance.

If you are interested to set up a display in the case or to have any sort of display anywhere in the Library, please complete the Request to Place or Erect an Exhibit/Display and submit it for advance review and approval to the Library or email it to archana.chiplunkar@livingston.bccls.org.  Your application must include photographs or samples of items to be displayed.  

The Exhibits and Displays Agreement must be signed prior to setting up any exhibit or display.

Once the application is approved, you will be contacted to schedule specific dates.

  UNICO is America’s largest Italian American service organization that hosts a number of events honoring their heritage during October, a month designated as Italian Heritage month. Their Library display highlights various books they have donated to the library covering Italian history and culture. There is special focus on honoring Christopher Columbus for his heroic voyages in founding the New World. His 4 voyages opened up the flood gates for Europeans to start their migration to America escaping prejudices to seek a land of liberty where they could freely practice their religion and escape the tyranny of the English monarchy. Besides books, there are posters, photographs and plaques demonstrating UNICO’s support of our community.

UNICO is America’s largest Italian American service organization that hosts a number of events honoring their heritage during October, a month designated as Italian Heritage month. Their Library display highlights various books they have donated to the library covering Italian history and culture. There is special focus on honoring Christopher Columbus for his heroic voyages in founding the New World. His 4 voyages opened up the flood gates for Europeans to start their migration to America escaping prejudices to seek a land of liberty where they could freely practice their religion and escape the tyranny of the English monarchy. Besides books, there are posters, photographs and plaques demonstrating UNICO’s support of our community.

  From Sept. 9 through September 30, the Livingston Library will showcase the history of the Barringer High School, Newark, NJ, the first public high school in the city of Newark and state of New Jersey, and third oldest in the country, established in 1838. This year the school celebrates its 180th anniversary.    It was a slow and hard beginning for public high school education and, even after its acceptance, the school was opened to only boys. But, on that bright day in 1838, 91 boys eagerly waited for the doors of Newark High to open. These young men, in spite of strict regulations and frequent punishment, persevered – the school thrived and before long the little high school became overcrowded. Throughout the years the school prospered with students displaying great loyalty and homage to their Alma Mater, a sentiment that has remained in effect to this day. Its journey through the years has produced many prominent individuals in all professional fields.    The Library display showcases the history of the school, highlighting memorabilia from all eras of its existence. Old photos, yearbooks, sports memorabilia, plus much more will all be on display. Included in the display also will be journals dating back to the Civil War era, written in pen and ink in the script of the day, describing life during the trying years of the war.    The Barringer High School Alumni Association is sponsoring this exhibit and they are in the process of restoring these valuable journals.

From Sept. 9 through September 30, the Livingston Library will showcase the history of the Barringer High School, Newark, NJ, the first public high school in the city of Newark and state of New Jersey, and third oldest in the country, established in 1838. This year the school celebrates its 180th anniversary.

It was a slow and hard beginning for public high school education and, even after its acceptance, the school was opened to only boys. But, on that bright day in 1838, 91 boys eagerly waited for the doors of Newark High to open. These young men, in spite of strict regulations and frequent punishment, persevered – the school thrived and before long the little high school became overcrowded. Throughout the years the school prospered with students displaying great loyalty and homage to their Alma Mater, a sentiment that has remained in effect to this day. Its journey through the years has produced many prominent individuals in all professional fields.

The Library display showcases the history of the school, highlighting memorabilia from all eras of its existence. Old photos, yearbooks, sports memorabilia, plus much more will all be on display. Included in the display also will be journals dating back to the Civil War era, written in pen and ink in the script of the day, describing life during the trying years of the war.

The Barringer High School Alumni Association is sponsoring this exhibit and they are in the process of restoring these valuable journals.

  The Library’s display case features the artwork of young artist Steffie Ossa until September 9th.    Born and raised in New Jersey, Steffie Ossa graduated Columbia High School in 2010 where she then went on to get both her Bachelor's and Master's degrees in English literature from Rutgers University. After working in libraries for eleven years, including at the Livingston Public Library for 3 years, she decided to move on and pursue her love for art, taking on the moniker of @YureiYume on Instagram where she posts her most recent pieces.    While she took the occasional art class in school, Steffie is primarily a self-taught traditional artist inspired by anime, manga, horror movies, books, and more. She uses pencil, ink, colored pencils, and copic markers to recreate her favorite characters and original creations. Some of the pieces on display are inspired by (and juxtaposed with) The Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice, The Ancient Magus' Bride by Kore Yamazaki, and Edward Scissorhands. Most recently, she has been diving into digital illustration, sometimes creating a fusion of traditional and digital artistry that blurs the line on what mixed media is and what it can look like.    Aside from showcasing her art on Instagram and displaying it in libraries, Steffie also works on traditional and digital commissions ranging from semi-realism to a more anime style. Her next big project is to start selling her pieces at festivals and conventions. She can be contacted at OssaEstefa@Gmail.com or her Instagram for commission and/or print inquiries.

The Library’s display case features the artwork of young artist Steffie Ossa until September 9th.

Born and raised in New Jersey, Steffie Ossa graduated Columbia High School in 2010 where she then went on to get both her Bachelor's and Master's degrees in English literature from Rutgers University. After working in libraries for eleven years, including at the Livingston Public Library for 3 years, she decided to move on and pursue her love for art, taking on the moniker of @YureiYume on Instagram where she posts her most recent pieces.

While she took the occasional art class in school, Steffie is primarily a self-taught traditional artist inspired by anime, manga, horror movies, books, and more. She uses pencil, ink, colored pencils, and copic markers to recreate her favorite characters and original creations. Some of the pieces on display are inspired by (and juxtaposed with) The Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice, The Ancient Magus' Bride by Kore Yamazaki, and Edward Scissorhands. Most recently, she has been diving into digital illustration, sometimes creating a fusion of traditional and digital artistry that blurs the line on what mixed media is and what it can look like.

Aside from showcasing her art on Instagram and displaying it in libraries, Steffie also works on traditional and digital commissions ranging from semi-realism to a more anime style. Her next big project is to start selling her pieces at festivals and conventions. She can be contacted at OssaEstefa@Gmail.com or her Instagram for commission and/or print inquiries.

  From August 1st to the 23rd, the Library’s display case will feature the crafts of Maya Bloom, who was born & raised in Jerusalem Israel.  Maya, designs jewelry, and leads interfaith women’s activities revolving around the creation of jewelry to develop dialogue and communication for peace and friendship. “In all traditions craftsmanship is a labor of creativity and culture”, says Maya. She has initiated “Bead for Peace” a project involving beading and crafting that is designed to support organizations and individuals who work for peace in the Middle East and beyond. “The word “to bead” says Maya, “is the same in Hebrew and Arabic and means to rhyme and to connect”. In a“Bead for Peace” item, you may find two beads in the form of a dove that symbolize peace, communication, connection and reconciliation. “Bead for Peace” invites individuals and organizations to join our effort to disseminate the message of tolerance and reconciliation through the creation of decorative craft items including jewelry. The Library exhibit includes Maya’s elegantly handcrafted jewelry (necklaces and earrings) pieces, incorporating seeds from around the world along with a variety of recycled materials.

From August 1st to the 23rd, the Library’s display case will feature the crafts of Maya Bloom, who was born & raised in Jerusalem Israel.
Maya, designs jewelry, and leads interfaith women’s activities revolving around the creation of jewelry to develop dialogue and communication for peace and friendship.
“In all traditions craftsmanship is a labor of creativity and culture”, says Maya.
She has initiated “Bead for Peace” a project involving beading and crafting that is designed to support organizations and individuals who work for peace in the Middle East and beyond.
“The word “to bead” says Maya, “is the same in Hebrew and Arabic and means to rhyme and to connect”. In a“Bead for Peace” item, you may find two beads in the form of a dove that symbolize peace, communication, connection and reconciliation.
“Bead for Peace” invites individuals and organizations to join our effort to disseminate the message of tolerance and reconciliation through the creation of decorative craft items including jewelry.
The Library exhibit includes Maya’s elegantly handcrafted jewelry (necklaces and earrings) pieces, incorporating seeds from around the world along with a variety of recycled materials.

  For the month of July, the Library’s display case features the works of local artist Linda Zamer.    Linda’s interest in art at an early age was inspired by several artistically talented family members, especially a favorite cousin who went on to become an accomplished art director. She says, “I remember being awed by watching him work and then seeing the finished product. His room/studio with many brushes, paints, equipment and completed artwork is still fresh in my memory. My earliest art classes were taken at The Newark Museum where I was able to spend Saturdays in the beautiful garden experimenting with various media.”    In her adulthood, Linda took painting classes and workshops (mostly in oils) in Livingston and Jupiter, Florida. She has exhibited at the Jupiter Lighthouse Art Center where she volunteers and sells art and has also exhibited at the Summit Art Center, in Livingston art shows and at the Morris County Library.    Her current exhibit highlights the concept of simple pleasures bringing life's greatest joys. The framed paintings include enjoying lovely gardens; laundry day in the country; evenings of music and visiting with friends, and memorable scenic moments. The medium is oil; the paintings were completed during the past three years, both in Livingston and Jupiter, with much of the work being done in her home studio.    Linda’s vibrant and colorful art on display can be enjoyed through July 30th.

For the month of July, the Library’s display case features the works of local artist Linda Zamer.

Linda’s interest in art at an early age was inspired by several artistically talented family members, especially a favorite cousin who went on to become an accomplished art director. She says, “I remember being awed by watching him work and then seeing the finished product. His room/studio with many brushes, paints, equipment and completed artwork is still fresh in my memory. My earliest art classes were taken at The Newark Museum where I was able to spend Saturdays in the beautiful garden experimenting with various media.”

In her adulthood, Linda took painting classes and workshops (mostly in oils) in Livingston and Jupiter, Florida. She has exhibited at the Jupiter Lighthouse Art Center where she volunteers and sells art and has also exhibited at the Summit Art Center, in Livingston art shows and at the Morris County Library.

Her current exhibit highlights the concept of simple pleasures bringing life's greatest joys. The framed paintings include enjoying lovely gardens; laundry day in the country; evenings of music and visiting with friends, and memorable scenic moments. The medium is oil; the paintings were completed during the past three years, both in Livingston and Jupiter, with much of the work being done in her home studio.

Linda’s vibrant and colorful art on display can be enjoyed through July 30th.

  The Library’s display case features some delightful art work done by students at the Rae Kushner Yeshiva High School in Livingston, NJ.    The pieces were selected from various projects that were done this year by all the four high school classes. Media used vary from charcoal drawing to pencil drawing, water color painting, tempera painting, ink painting, pen and ink, mosaic paper tiles and mock stained glass.    Brief descriptions of some of the art projects of which sample pieces are in the exhibit:   Students studied work by MC Escher and from his famous eye drawing, did renderings of their own eye using a mirror, drawing pencils, stomps, kneaded erasers, gum erasers and their new skills.    In a nod to Marc Chagall, students chose a theme from nature and created "mock stained glass" using tissue paper, cello paper, glue, mod podge, and sharpies on Lucite boards.    Displayed are some contour drawings of students’ shoes by using ink. The contour drawings were enhanced by using hatching and cross hatching techniques to give the feeling of depth, texture and dimension.    Students created a collage based on their own traits and identifying with animals that have these traits. They made a creature by incorporating at least 3 different animals. The next project was to render the creature in pencil to make it look believable and then to paint the same creature on canvas using acrylic paints.    Also displayed are works in acrylics, pieces following Japanese ink painting techniques, drawings of sea shells “from life”, and “song” inspired works.

The Library’s display case features some delightful art work done by students at the Rae Kushner Yeshiva High School in Livingston, NJ.

The pieces were selected from various projects that were done this year by all the four high school classes. Media used vary from charcoal drawing to pencil drawing, water color painting, tempera painting, ink painting, pen and ink, mosaic paper tiles and mock stained glass.

Brief descriptions of some of the art projects of which sample pieces are in the exhibit:

Students studied work by MC Escher and from his famous eye drawing, did renderings of their own eye using a mirror, drawing pencils, stomps, kneaded erasers, gum erasers and their new skills.

In a nod to Marc Chagall, students chose a theme from nature and created "mock stained glass" using tissue paper, cello paper, glue, mod podge, and sharpies on Lucite boards.

Displayed are some contour drawings of students’ shoes by using ink. The contour drawings were enhanced by using hatching and cross hatching techniques to give the feeling of depth, texture and dimension.

Students created a collage based on their own traits and identifying with animals that have these traits. They made a creature by incorporating at least 3 different animals. The next project was to render the creature in pencil to make it look believable and then to paint the same creature on canvas using acrylic paints.

Also displayed are works in acrylics, pieces following Japanese ink painting techniques, drawings of sea shells “from life”, and “song” inspired works.

  Starting Feb 15 till Feb 27, the display case highlights a Chinese painting and calligraphy exhibition by Du Li, a painter and calligrapher from Beijing. Mr. Li’s pen name is Mo Chi,which means "a pond of ink." On display are some charming and elegantly created ink and wash paintings, a form of traditional Chinese painting that is noted for using several brush strokes to portray landscapes, flowers, birds, and figures. Just as its name suggests, an ink and wash painting is an art work created with water and ink, in different densities, to produce variations in tonality. Also on display by Mr. Li are works of Chinese calligraphy, a form of aesthetic writing and artistic expression of Chinese language in a tangible form. This type of expression has been widely practiced in China and has been generally highly regarded in the Chinese culture.

Starting Feb 15 till Feb 27, the display case highlights a Chinese painting and calligraphy exhibition by Du Li, a painter and calligrapher from Beijing. Mr. Li’s pen name is Mo Chi,which means "a pond of ink." On display are some charming and elegantly created ink and wash paintings, a form of traditional Chinese painting that is noted for using several brush strokes to portray landscapes, flowers, birds, and figures. Just as its name suggests, an ink and wash painting is an art work created with water and ink, in different densities, to produce variations in tonality. Also on display by Mr. Li are works of Chinese calligraphy, a form of aesthetic writing and artistic expression of Chinese language in a tangible form. This type of expression has been widely practiced in China and has been generally highly regarded in the Chinese culture.

  For the first month of the New Year, the Library showcases an elegant and attractive collection of cross stitch embroidery created by local resident Olena Nesteruk.

For the first month of the New Year, the Library showcases an elegant and attractive collection of cross stitch embroidery created by local resident Olena Nesteruk.

  Local resident Janet Resnick displays her varied collection of dreidels built up since she was in kindergarten. They are made of different materials such as paper, plastic, silver, clay, glass, and come from all over the world. These four-sided spinning tops are used to play games with on Hanukkah. This unique display can be enjoyed through December.

Local resident Janet Resnick displays her varied collection of dreidels built up since she was in kindergarten. They are made of different materials such as paper, plastic, silver, clay, glass, and come from all over the world. These four-sided spinning tops are used to play games with on Hanukkah. This unique display can be enjoyed through December.

  November 2017 Display - Collection of stuffed teddy bears and teddy bear themed collectibles belonging to Livingston resident, Herta Conrads.

November 2017 Display - Collection of stuffed teddy bears and teddy bear themed collectibles belonging to Livingston resident, Herta Conrads.

  A delightful display of toy figurines from the 100+ collection of Livingston 4th grader, Dhwani Viswanathan, lights up the display case until February 14th. Dhwani was inspired to start collecting 5 years ago, by her aunt's grand collection of over 500 figurines. Items from her precious collection which she is sharing with the community include Disney princesses, The Jungle Book, The Lion King, Sesame Street, Tinker Bell and friends, Chota Bheem (an Indian cartoon show), Zootopia, Finding Dory, and some special figures from Egypt!

A delightful display of toy figurines from the 100+ collection of Livingston 4th grader, Dhwani Viswanathan, lights up the display case until February 14th. Dhwani was inspired to start collecting 5 years ago, by her aunt's grand collection of over 500 figurines. Items from her precious collection which she is sharing with the community include Disney princesses, The Jungle Book, The Lion King, Sesame Street, Tinker Bell and friends, Chota Bheem (an Indian cartoon show), Zootopia, Finding Dory, and some special figures from Egypt!

ORIGAMI

MILITARY MEMORABILIA

LOCAL ARTWORK

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