Displays & Exhibits

Wood Assemblage Sculptures by Fifth grade students Mt. Pleasant Elementary School; Art Teacher: Ms. Abrams  Students studied sculptures by Louise Nevelson, Marisol, and Brancusi, before creating abstract wood sculptures. They made sure to have an interesting balance of positive and negative spaces in their work. They considered the unifying power of color and repetition and the idea that breaking a color or pattern focuses one’s attention on that part of the artwork.   Masks by Fourth grade students Burnet Hill Elementary School; Art Teacher: Ms. Abrams  Students created masks influenced by cultures around the world on personally important themes as varied as nature, superheroes, and donuts.   Cubist Cityscapes By First grade students Harrison Elementary: Art Teacher: Ms. Stein  Students at Harrison learned about Cubism and how objects are taken apart, looked at on all angles, and put back together in a two dimensional format. For this project they looked at Pablo Picasso’s painting of a violin and talked about what they could see in the painting. The students were then given sponges, cardboard, and other texture tools to create an artwork inspired by cityscapes. The students explored these concepts with a limited palette of red, yellow and black while exploring the variety of textures and lines they could create in the cubist style.   Alebrijes Clay Sculptures By Third Grade students Harrison Elementary: Art Teacher: Ms. Stein  Students at Harrison learned about Mexican clay animal sculptures called Alebrijes which were made popular by the movie Coco. After learning about these sculptures in Spanish class, in their art class students were able to design their own spirit animals on paper. They then used air dry clay to create a three dimensional sculpture. The students painted these animals with acrylic paint in the iconic bright and highly detailed style of this Mexican art form.

Wood Assemblage Sculptures by Fifth grade students
Mt. Pleasant Elementary School; Art Teacher: Ms. Abrams
Students studied sculptures by Louise Nevelson, Marisol, and Brancusi, before creating abstract wood sculptures. They made sure to have an interesting balance of positive and negative spaces in their work. They considered the unifying power of color and repetition and the idea that breaking a color or pattern focuses one’s attention on that part of the artwork.

Masks by Fourth grade students
Burnet Hill Elementary School; Art Teacher: Ms. Abrams
Students created masks influenced by cultures around the world on personally important themes as varied as nature, superheroes, and donuts.

Cubist Cityscapes By First grade students
Harrison Elementary: Art Teacher: Ms. Stein
Students at Harrison learned about Cubism and how objects are taken apart, looked at on all angles, and put back together in a two dimensional format. For this project they looked at Pablo Picasso’s painting of a violin and talked about what they could see in the painting. The students were then given sponges, cardboard, and other texture tools to create an artwork inspired by cityscapes. The students explored these concepts with a limited palette of red, yellow and black while exploring the variety of textures and lines they could create in the cubist style.

Alebrijes Clay Sculptures By Third Grade students
Harrison Elementary: Art Teacher: Ms. Stein
Students at Harrison learned about Mexican clay animal sculptures called Alebrijes which were made popular by the movie Coco. After learning about these sculptures in Spanish class, in their art class students were able to design their own spirit animals on paper. They then used air dry clay to create a three dimensional sculpture. The students painted these animals with acrylic paint in the iconic bright and highly detailed style of this Mexican art form.

The Livingston Public Library welcomes exhibits and displays, which further the educational, cultural, intellectual, charitable and/or public service objectives of the Library. Exhibits and displays which incorporate books and other Library materials are especially encouraged.  The Library recognizes its role in nurturing local talent and culture and, therefore, extends its preference in scheduling exhibits and displays to local schools, civic and community groups and local artists.  The Library also encourages exhibits and displays by collectors, crafts people and hobbyists.  Other displays may be devoted to an aspect of community life, science, education, family life, local or other history, community accomplishments, national anniversaries or events, or traveling exhibits in various fields and areas of interest.

All exhibits are subject to the terms of the Livingston Public Library’s Exhibits and Displays Policy.

The Library has a lighted glass display case (H 15”; D 20”) by the entrance where the displays can last from 2 weeks to a month.  Scheduling for this is arranged several months in advance.

If you are interested to set up a display in the case or to have any sort of display anywhere in the Library, please complete the Request to Place or Erect an Exhibit/Display and submit it for advance review and approval to the Library or email it to archana.chiplunkar@livingston.bccls.org.  Your application must include photographs or samples of items to be displayed.  

The Exhibits and Displays Agreement must be signed prior to setting up any exhibit or display.

Once the application is approved, you will be contacted to schedule specific dates.

Past Displays:

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